"Life is too short to make bad art."

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Choosing your highlight and shader colours

I am not into colour theory - having worked by instinct most of the time - so picking the shading colours to me is not a big decision. 
Today I received that very question on the blog [again] and after a quick try I came up with this:



I hope this is helpful! Enjoy!



12 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. You are welcome... I hope it makes sense and is not too obvious and simple...

      Delete
  2. Thank you very much for you nice tut..

    ReplyDelete
  3. Typically, cooler colours (blueish) are used for shadows and warmer colours (yellowish) for highlights. You may not be into colour theory but your instict appears to be spot on :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Chris, how do you export your sprites? PNG gives me blurred edge

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do export at a larger size and then use gimp to scale it down. E.g. I am creating my character assets in a square box as a canvas area and export it at 512x512 even if I need a 96x96 or smaller output. That way I get better/ cleaner outlines and the scaling algorithm in gimp/ photoshop or other bitmap tools usually is superior to inkscape's.

      http://2dgameartforprogrammers.blogspot.com/2012/02/working-with-bitmap-output-in-mind.html

      Delete
  5. you always make that simple.. thank's :D

    ReplyDelete
  6. I have a question: In the third row the lightening/shading colors are suddenly white and green, instead of yellow and blueish as before. Is this intentional, so for the tree you use these shading colors?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes... Sorry for changing without a mention. The shader with white and green just felt softer. You would use the yellow and purple for a late sunset fell with strong shadow and warmer highlights - the white and green is more a midday sunshine feel.

      Delete
  7. The only problem with choosing the color from the shading object with the color picker is that it chooses the exact same color but without transparency (it calculates the color without transpranacy). So if you want to change the main color, all shadows have to be replaced, too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To avoid that problem you can always work with the shades being transparent objects that are cut to fit by e.g. a clip.

      Delete